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20130201
20130228
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 40
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
bill clinton saying the era of big government is over. by saying that he was going to act executive action if congress didn't act. and seeming very reasonable even though he wasn't combative, he was arguing to the country i think even more to the congress. and then he did have some refrains in there that got a lot of applause. i remember in 6 5 lbj say how many times did they applause me. he understood the need for refrains and he came back to what he talked about in his inaugural, the role of citizens which mean he's trying to mobilize the country to put pressure on the congress to do the things he wants done. >> rose: walter what did you see as the theme of this statement. >> i thought it was a great continuation of the inaugural thing, which is inclusiveness and opportunity. that's the theme of our nation and that's what really separates his agenda, i think from some of his opponents which is we want to bring everybody in, we want there to be ladders of opportunity, doors of opportunity. and the fact it had a thematic connection to inaugural, that it is a place where opportunity
, secretary clinton did, which mandated or agreed that there would be a political transition, that there would be opposition and government members of that transition and that the makeup would have to be mutually agreed to. of course it going to be mutually agreed to, you know the opposition would not have had assad going in this going forward that is where the breakdown of the russians has taken place. we continue to engage with them, meet with them regularly, we have not come to an agreement on a political way forward here. i hope we can do that. >> in the near term. >> well, i think the sooner the better as i said. now during the course of this year, the president will have the opportunity to meet with president putin on a number of occasions beginning this spring. >> but aren't you going to see putin soon wince i think i will visit russia in the next month. >> and see putin. >> yes. >> what do you want to come out of that and did you reset the relationship so that it's more likely that you can have, because if you have good big power understanding it gives you more leverage to deal with th
and major changes. president bush 41 raised taxes at a time when he needed to. president clinton did. deals between president clinton and speaker gingrich in the '95, '96, '97 time frame. we have come together a lot of times in our past we just can't seem to do it now. >> rose: what's changed. >> i think what has changed are these two things. one that it is tougher because resources are scarcer. and the numbers are so much bigger. and secondly, i do think we're living in a more polarized era. i there in one more thing. i think sadly we are living in a more selfish era. i think nobody really wants to pay the costs. for example, an average person at 65, about to enter medicare has paid $122,000 into the medicare system. >> rose: 122,000. >> thousand, they will get back inflation adjusted, they will get back $377,000 dollars over their ellerly years. you don't have to have study a lot of math to know those numbers don't work. and so all this debt we're piling up, these 800, 900 billion dollar deficits, all these promises, we're sticking on our children. and that to me is very depressing. >> ro
world, secretary clinton said it's part of the solution, not part of the problem. >> right. >> it has really acquired a tremendous amount of respect. but people will be able to judge for themselves. >> rose: i will ask these questions because i want to gets some of them in. here is an obvious question but and that we should ask. is nuclear energy such as coal, fusion a true solution toned our dependence on fossil fuel and help curb global warming? >> well, it is certainly not a silver bullet it may play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expensive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fu
an economic advisor to president clinton. now he teaches at princeton. alan blinder's latest book is after the music stops, the financial crisis. the response and the work ahead. he says it tries to answer the question, how do we get into this mess and how do we get out of it? i am pleased to have alan blinder back on this program. lcom >> thankou very much. charlie: i'll say this to you. if you're going to write a book, then you need somebody to endorse it. this is not bad. a master piece. simple. straightforward. and wise. president william j. clinton. >> i have to admit i was pretty pleased with that endorsement. >> he actually read the book. i thought he would skim it. >> charlie: could you tell for sure. >> i wasn't going to do that. i think it's impolite to a former' president. >> charlie: you think he read the book. >> he said he read the book. charlie: here was the question though. before we talk about the book. let's talk about where we are today. we had a dip in the fourth quarter. do you read anything into that? >> not very much. we had a dip in the fourth imparter in the g.d.p.
from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis of the question that elicited secretary panetta's response. in iraq training the troops was looking for a way in syria. he wanted not only to influence the situation on the ground now but assuming assad is deposed, the thought was it would be beneficial from the united states had some stronger relationships with the fighting groups of groups inside syria. the people actually in control the ground. then secretary of state hillary clinton supported that argument. so did leon panetta and general dempsey. that was brought to th whitehouse before the election not a political climb to do something controversial like that but it would have been a limited operation in the sense they weren't going to provide what they call man pads, air defense weapons because they didn't want to risk them falling into the wrong hands and endangering israeli
do. >> rose: secretary of state clinton, who you worked with, panetta petraeus, all recommended we do something. and the president said no, and you say the president was right to say no and other people can asthis qestion: how many syans ve t die before the west does something? >> well, i think this has to constantly be reexamined. as i understand it, the president is looking at things again. trying to figure out -- i talk about something called-- i made this up-- the doability doctrine. >> rose: right. >> can we really make a difference? and i know some people have compared it to the we did something military in libya with nato. very different kind of situation because the libyan army basically didn't exit. the question is whether there's value in creating a nfly zone. etr it would really do something useful. whether -- the questions i would ask is whether the assad military regime has been weakened so that in fact there can be a functional no-fly zone. the other question i would ask is how many arms are needed there? as i understand it, there have been a provision of arms by other c
for the two years that i was there, as i watched his from predecessor, president clinton for eight years during his administration, and both of them made judgments that reflected the political reality of a particular moment. if you don't believe in politics, you really shouldn't be president. but my observation of president obama, like my observation of president clinton, was that they understood that in the long run history was going to be the judge and that was all that really mattered. and if the issue was really important, they were going to do what they thought was best for the country. and president obama believes there are some very important principles here about what kind of process there should be, as the president negotiates with congress, about the need for balance between spending and revenues as we address national problems. about looking at all different areas, as we address these things. >> rose: and do you believe -- >> while protecting the middle class at a time when inequality in our country really has taken off in a very, very dramatic way and so -- >> rose: a gap...
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)